Science

Charterhouse Centre

Charterhouse is a residential centre located in the heart of the Mendip Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is ideally situated for groups wanting to take advantage of the fantastic walks, local caves and climbing venues the area has to offer.

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Foundations of Mendip (British Geological Survey) - Going Caving

If you are interested in going caving, one of the best ways of starting is by joining a local caving club or contacting the British Caving Association (BCA). They have the benefit of experienced members, and may be able to provide equipment, training, permits and access to local caves, as well organising trips and expeditions. There are numerous clubs based on or around the Mendip Hills. Many of the larger clubs offer accommodation in huts on or close to Mendip; these are listed below.

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Foundations of Mendip (British Geological Survey) - Quarrying and Geodiversity

Discover the rich 'geodiversity' of the Mendip Hills which means there is a large range of rock types exposed in a small area. This superb diversity of rock types, ranging from Silurian to Jurassic in age, are exposed in many natural rock outcrops, particularly in the western Mendips where the limestone gorges and caves at Cheddar and Wookey are national tourist icons

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Foundations of Mendip (British Geological Survey) - Industrial Archaeology

The remains of mine workings can be seen across much of central and western Mendip, especially around Shipham, Charterhouse, Priddy and Stockhill Forest. Iron, lead, zinc and ochre have all been mined at various times and places across Mendip. The old mine workings are often characterised by areas of 'gruffy' ground, a local name for uneven hummocky landscape created during mining operations. On eastern Mendip, coal mining was more important.

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